Our next Meeting:

Wednesday 28th November

2018

Ashcroft Hall, Ashcroft

Road Cirencester 7.30pm

Francis Haverfield’s

‘Roman Cirencester’:

Then and Now

Neil Holbrook

Neil is Chief Executive of Cotswold Archaeology and a specialist on Roman Britain. Francis John Haverfield (1860-1919) has been described as the greatest archaeologist of Roman Britain. Neil will talk about the 1920 publication of his paper on Cirencester, and its relevance to our understanding of the town’s archaeology today. Would you like to receive a reminder about each meeting? Whether a member or not, send your email address to cahs @ cirenhistory.org.uk  (without the spaces!)

Welcome to Cirencester

Archaeological &

Historical Society

We are always happy to see new members. Do browse our site to see what we do. While our main activity is our meetings, we have other interests, such as our projects and the publishing of short articles in our Newsletters or even on line. News items will usually be on this page, though more may be found on our facebook page.

New on this page

Glos History Festival Sisters Longbarrow WW1 Timeline

On this page

KYPWest Volunteers wanted! Kingshill South Memorial Hospital

New on other pages

Miscellany  revisited Data Privacy Policy Gloucestershire History Reports Webnote 1
© Cirencester Archaeological & Historical Society & Contributors 2016-8 Registered Charity no. 287289
Cirencester Archaeological & Historical Society Museums to visit Museums to visit
Bournemouth University Department of Archaeology have again been excavating the Sisters Longbarrow, above, this August. A guided tour was held  on the last day of the dig, Wednesday 22nd August, when Tim Darvill explained all that was new this year. BU intend to be back next year, courtesy of member Will Chester- Master, the landowner. Our  October meeting was a description of Planted Towns, Norman Town Planning, concentrating on his own town of Norhleach, by Peter Dawson. The next meeting is a favourite topic, Roman Cirencester, given by Neil Holbrook, CE of Cotswold Archaeology. The future Programme is now available on the Talks page. . If you would like to receive a reminder about future meetings write to us at cahs @ cirenhistory.org.uk (without the spaces!) Meanwhile read on for other activities… Our first WebNote is now online, a discussion on Cirencester Watercpurses by Richard Reece. If you would like to publish a short article, contact our Editor We are republishing articles from the Cirencester Miscellany  series. Christopher Catling has kindly being transcribing them during his long train journeys from Wales to London. The first three are from Miscellany 2 of 1988. June Summer Meeting for GLHA About 60 visitors from other county societies joined us for an afternoon in Cirencester on June 23rd, where they took a number of walks around the town, church or Cirencester Park, and were given refreshments before dispersing. We would like to thank all those members and non-members that helped this afternoon go so well, and special thanks to Alan Strickland who did the bulk of the organising and booking. Tewkesbury Battlefield Society is having a series of talks on Saturday 5th January  Details> We have received from Berkeley Homes a copy of the report into the Archaeology of Kingshill south prepared by Oxford Archaeology. Please use the email button (right) if you wish to know more. The Old Ciren Facebook Page has alerted us to the Digitised historical copies of the Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard, made by British Newspaper Archives . There are some gaps but by mid September 2017 the issues from 1837 to 1910 had been uploaded. It will no doubt require a subscription to study in detail, but a free page is displayed each day. Microfiche copies of all issues of the Standard are available in Cirencester library. KnowYourPlaceWest now has mapping for Wilts, Gloucestershire and Somerset. Maps from about 1840 to date can be compared, and, after moderation, you can add historical information. Do watch the video to see how to use it! Have fun! (December- tithe maps added where they exist)

 A Century Ago...

With the Centenary of the 1918 Armistice  now passed, we record those who died later… RALPH MORTIMER WRIGLEY whose parents lived at The Barton died in hospital on 6 November aged 21, a Lieutenant with 3rd Railway Company, Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers. He is commemorated on their memorial in the Priory Church at Monmouth. 1918 November 11: Armistice Day - ceasefire on the Western Front. 1918-1919: A world-wide influenza pandemic continued throughout the winter. WILLIAM SHILL died on 22 November, age 26, a Private in A Company 11/OBLI. His parents Richard and Louisa Helen of Field Barn Ewen had lost a younger son HOWARD in 1916. FREDERICK GEORGE ALLEN or ALLAN died in December 1918 having been discharged that April as unfit for further military service. In 1911 he had lived at 30 Victoria Road with a wife and small daughter. As a married man of 40 he could have claimed exemption from conscription but enlisted at Bath in February 1916 in the Somerset Light Infantry. FREDERICK WILLIAM RICHINGS was born in 1877, son of Alfred and Roseanna of 77 City Bank Road. He had 24 years service with the Glosters including the Siege of Ladysmith, and had been wounded in 1917. He had been promoted to Sergeant Major and awarded the Meritorious Service Medal. FREDERICK died at home on leave whilst awaiting demobilization, shortly before his intended marriage. He is buried in Cirencester Cemetery CYRIL LAWSON COLE - Captain 2/5 Glosters and Transport Officer 184 Infantry Brigade died on 14 March 1919. He was the third son of William Henry and Catherine of  Bourne House Brimscombe to die. MARK A WRIGHT died the next day, aged 39. He served as Sapper in 54 Division Signals Company. He was son of Alfred Benjamin of Cirencester and husband of Agnes, living in Burton on Trent. Both men are buried in Etaples, a base area in Northern France where there were several hospitals. Their names are not on the St John’s Church memorial erected in November 1918. 1919 June 28: Treaty of Versailles signed, declaring Germany guilty of causing the war and liable to pay reparations. PERCY GEYTON’s name was added after his death on 29 July 1919. He had served as Second Lieutenant in the Machine Gun Corps. PERCY had attended Cirencester Grammar School and became a bank clerk working in Devizes. His father lived at 6 Cricklade Street and was a wine merchant’s manager. JOHN KENT is buried in Cirencester Cemetery. He died on 26 October 1919 aged 46. He had served as Staff Sergeant Farrier in 19 Hussars and left a wife, Gertrude Mary ARTHUR CHARLES HAINES had served as a Sergeant in the Royal Marines Light Infantry, on HMS Cornwallis in the Dardanelles and then in HMS Lord Nelson. He died at home, 10 Whiteway Road Spitalgate, of illness resulting from service, on 15 February 1920. CHARLES HENRY NEWELL’s name was added to St John’s Church memorial following his death on 1 September 1920 of injuries received in the war. He had served as a Corporal and is buried in Cirencester Cemetery JULIA HERBERT is the only woman commemorated on Cirencester war memorials. She was a volunteer nurse at Bingham Hall. Three Cirencester men who died after the war as a result of  wounds or illness are buried in Cirencester Cemetery; all three left widows living in the town - W GARDINER - Corporal 25/Middlesex died on 13 May 1921 aged 37; C HOOPER - Sergeant 5/Glosters died 19 June 1921 aged 60. JESSE BENJAMIN WRIGHT - Private 3/Rifle Brigade died on 25 August 1921 aged 37.

Timeline written by Dale Hjort

More about some of these men can be found in our WW1 biography section.   Do follow the Timeline in the Parish Church for what else went on a Century ago. It too changes monthly.
Page last updated 11 November 2018

Navigating our site

Not all pages are immediately apparent from the links at the top. The Great War  biographies, covering very many pages, have internal links. and the articles reprinted from our past publications are linked from the relevant Newsletter page. There is a facility to browse these at random at the bottom of most articles.
Links… Links…
The old Memorial Hospital on Sheep Street (used within the last 30 years) used to hold the Bannatyne memorial staircase. It has recently been carefully removed and sent to relatives in Ireland, making way for the refurbishment of the car park. Cotswold Archaeology has written a number of studies for CDC that are worth reading. See the downloads for the Parking Project.  Click the picture  above to read David Viner’s notes on the Hospital and the Staircase. The building across Sheep Street, called the Memorial Hospital Annex, is still in NHS use. It has the Great War memorial panels on its side. We have an article  about this building.

Welcome to Cirencester Archaeological & Historical

Society

We are always happy to see new members. Do browse our site to see what we do. While our main activity is our meetings, we have other interests, such as our projects and the publishing of short articles in our Newsletters or even on line. News items will usually be on this page.

New on this page

Sisters Longbarrow Kingshill South report WW1 Timeline

On this page

KYPWest

New on other Pages

Cirencester watercourses - webnote 1 Miscellany revisited Gloucestershire History Reports
© CAHS & contributors 2016-8 Registered Charity 287289
Cirencester Archaeological  & Historical Society Museums to visit Museums to visit
Bournemouth University Department of Archaeology have again been excavating the Sisters Longbarrow, above, this August. A guided tour was  held  on the last day of the dig, Wednesday 22nd August, when Tim Darvill explained all that was new this year. BU intend to be back next year, courtesy of member Will Chester-Master, the landowner. Our  October meeting was a description of Planted Towns, Norman Town Planning, concentrating on his own town of Norhleach, by Peter Dawson. The next meeting is a favourite topic, Roman Cirencester, given by Neil Holbrook, CE of Cotswold Archaeology. The future Programme is now available on the Talks page. . If you would like to receive a reminder about future meetings write to us at cahs @ cirenhistory.org.uk  (without the spaces!) Meanwhile read on for other activities… Our first WebNote is now online, a discussion on Cirencester Watercpurses by Richard Reece. If you would like to publish a short article, contact our Editor We are republishing articles from the Cirencester Miscellany series. Christopher Catling has kindly being transcribing them during his long train journeys from Wales to London. The first three are from Miscellany 2 of 1988. June Summer Meeting for GLHA About 60 visitors from other county societies joined us for an afternoon in Cirencester on June 23rd, where they took a number of walks around the town, church or Cirencester Park, and were given refreshments before dispersing. We would like to thank all those members and non- members that helped this afternoon go so well, and special thanks to Alan Strickland who did the bulk of the organising and booking. Tewkesbury Battlefield Society is having a series of talks on Saturday 5th January  Details> We have received from Berkeley Homes a copy of the report into the Archaeology of Kingshill south prepared by Oxford Archaeology. Please use the email button (right) if you wish to know more. The Old Ciren Facebook Page has alerted us to the Digitised historical copies of the Wilts and Gloucestershire Standard, made by British Newspaper Archives . There are some gaps but by mid September 2017 the issues from 1837 to 1910 had been uploaded. It will no doubt require a subscription to study in detail, but a free page is displayed each day. Microfiche copies of all issues of the Standard are available in Cirencester library. KnowYourPlaceWest now has mapping for Wilts, Gloucestershire and Somerset. Maps from about 1840 to date can be compared, and, after moderation, you can add historical information. Do watch the video to see how to use it! Have fun! (December- tithe maps added where they exist)

 A Century Ago...

With the Centenary of the 1918 Armistice  now passed, we record those who died later… RALPH MORTIMER WRIGLEY whose parents lived at The Barton died in hospital on 6 November aged 21, a Lieutenant with 3rd Railway Company, Royal Monmouthshire Royal Engineers. He is commemorated on their memorial in the Priory Church at Monmouth. 1918 November 11: Armistice Day - ceasefire on the Western Front. 1918-1919: A world-wide influenza pandemic continued throughout the winter. WILLIAM SHILL died on 22 November, age 26, a Private in A Company 11/OBLI. His parents Richard and Louisa Helen of Field Barn Ewen had lost a younger son HOWARD in 1916. FREDERICK GEORGE ALLEN or ALLAN died in December 1918 having been discharged that April as unfit for further military service. In 1911 he had lived at 30 Victoria Road with a wife and small daughter. As a married man of 40 he could have claimed exemption from conscription but enlisted at Bath in February 1916 in the Somerset Light Infantry. FREDERICK WILLIAM RICHINGS was born in 1877, son of Alfred and Roseanna of 77 City Bank Road. He had 24 years service with the Glosters including the Siege of Ladysmith, and had been wounded in 1917. He had been promoted to Sergeant Major and awarded the Meritorious Service Medal. FREDERICK died at home on leave whilst awaiting demobilization, shortly before his intended marriage. He is buried in Cirencester Cemetery CYRIL LAWSON COLE - Captain 2/5 Glosters and Transport Officer 184 Infantry Brigade died on 14 March 1919. He was the third son of William Henry and Catherine of  Bourne House Brimscombe to die. MARK A WRIGHT died the next day, aged 39. He served as Sapper in 54 Division Signals Company. He was son of Alfred Benjamin of Cirencester and husband of Agnes, living in Burton on Trent. Both men are buried in Etaples, a base area in Northern France where there were several hospitals. Their names are not on the St John’s Church memorial erected in November 1918. 1919 June 28: Treaty of Versailles signed, declaring Germany guilty of causing the war and liable to pay reparations. PERCY GEYTON’s name was added after his death on 29 July 1919. He had served as Second Lieutenant in the Machine Gun Corps. PERCY had attended Cirencester Grammar School and became a bank clerk working in Devizes. His father lived at 6 Cricklade Street and was a wine merchant’s manager. JOHN KENT is buried in Cirencester Cemetery. He died on 26 October 1919 aged 46. He had served as Staff Sergeant Farrier in 19 Hussars and left a wife, Gertrude Mary ARTHUR CHARLES HAINES had served as a Sergeant in the Royal Marines Light Infantry, on HMS Cornwallis in the Dardanelles and then in HMS Lord Nelson. He died at home, 10 Whiteway Road Spitalgate, of illness resulting from service, on 15 February 1920. CHARLES HENRY NEWELL’s name was added to St John’s Church memorial following his death on 1 September 1920 of injuries received in the war. He had served as a Corporal and is buried in Cirencester Cemetery JULIA HERBERT is the only woman commemorated on Cirencester war memorials. She was a volunteer nurse at Bingham Hall. Three Cirencester men who died after the war as a result of  wounds or illness are buried in Cirencester Cemetery; all three left widows living in the town - W GARDINER - Corporal 25/Middlesex died on 13 May 1921 aged 37; C HOOPER - Sergeant 5/Glosters died 19 June 1921 aged 60. JESSE BENJAMIN WRIGHT - Private 3/Rifle Brigade died on 25 August 1921 aged 37.

Timeline written by Dale Hjort

More about some of these men can be found in our WW1 biography section.   Do follow the Timeline in the Parish Church for what else went on a Century ago. It too changes monthly.
External Links External Links
Page last updated 11 November 2018
See more on our widescreen version….