© Cirencester Archaeological & Historical Society & Contributors 2016-7 Registered Charity no. 287289
Cirencester Archaeological & Historical Society

About us

History & Archaeology of Cirencester

If you live in or near Cirencester and are interested in Archaeology or History, then the Cirencester Archaeological and Historical Society is for you. The society has been in existence for over sixty years. In the early days it sponsored "digs" in the Cotswold area. As Archaeology is now well catered for in the planning system, we restrict ourselves nowadays to talks, visits, publications, such as the "Miscellany" series, and various projects. Meetings are held from September to May, usually on the fourth Wednesday of each month. For the season 2016-7 they will mostly be held in Cirencester's Ashcroft Centre, but we also visit the Bingham Hall, Cirencester Parish Church and the Corn Hall for a special evening celebrating Abbey900 Cirencester Archaeological and Historical Society was founded in 1955 following local anxiety that due to the many changes going on in the town, building sites should be monitored “to ensure that nothing of historical interest should be unwittingly destroyed, and that records should be made of any discoveries”. This continues to be of importance and committee members regularly assess the implications of development proposals in Cirencester. The Society has an annual programme of lectures, many with particular reference to the local area, but some of wider national interest. Visits to sites and buildings of archaeological and historic interest are arranged and where possible, members are invited to view excavations under the supervision of professional experts. Members are also encouraged to take part in special projects supported by the Society. The Society’s Millennium Project was to outline in slabs and install a plaque in the Abbey grounds, giving information on the history of the great Augustinian Abbey of St. Mary, which dominated the landscape and lives of the people of Cirencester for over 400 years. This was completed with help from the Town Council who own the grounds, and thus was opened by the Mayor one rainy evening during 2000. The Society is generous in helping other local groups and charities whose aims and causes it shares. For example, the restoration of the Bowly Almshouses in Watermoor Road, and the memorial to Sir Robert Atkyns in Sapperton Church. Many students and others have also been supported in their historical research projects. Cirencester Archaeological and Historical Society shares many aims and concerns with Cirencester Civic Society, and both groups join annually for the Croome  Lecture each February.  We also hold an annual joint lecture with the Cirencester Science and Technology Society and include Cotswold Archaeology’s annual Mick Aston Lecture in our programme. If you would like to join us, see the membership page.
See David Viner’s article on “The Cirencester Obelisk”

Have you some favourite Local History Story?

We are keen to  publish short history or archaeological pieces about the area in our Newsletter, currently published once a year, or online if appropriate. If you would like to write up your story, get in touch with our Newsletter Editor.
© CAHS & contributors 2016-7 Registered Charity 287289
Cirencester Archaeological  & Historical Society

About us

History &

Archaeology of

Cirencester

If you live in or near Cirencester and are interested in Archaeology or History, then the Cirencester Archaeological and Historical Society is for you. The society has been in existence for over sixty years. In the early days it sponsored "digs" in the Cotswold area. As Archaeology is now well catered for in the planning system, we restrict ourselves nowadays to talks, visits, publications, such as the "Miscellany" series, and various projects. Meetings are held from September to May, usually on the fourth Wednesday of each month. For the season 2016-7 they will mostly be held in Cirencester's Ashcroft Centre, but we also visit the Bingham Hall, Cirencester Parish Church and the Corn Hall for a special evening celebrating Abbey900 Cirencester Archaeological and Historical Society was founded in 1955 following local anxiety that due to the many changes going on in the town, building sites should be monitored “to ensure that nothing of historical interest should be unwittingly destroyed, and that records should be made of any discoveries”. This continues to be of importance and committee members regularly assess the implications of development proposals in Cirencester. The Society has an annual programme of lectures, many with particular reference to the local area, but some of wider national interest. Visits to sites and buildings of archaeological and historic interest are arranged and where possible, members are invited to view excavations under the supervision of professional experts. Members are also encouraged to take part in special projects supported by the Society. The Society’s Millennium Project was to outline in slabs and install a plaque in the Abbey grounds, giving information on the history of the great Augustinian Abbey of St. Mary, which dominated the landscape and lives of the people of Cirencester for over 400 years. This was completed with help from the Town Council who own the grounds, and thus was opened by the Mayor one rainy evening during 2000. The Society is generous in helping other local groups and charities whose aims and causes it shares. For example, the restoration of the Bowly Almshouses in Watermoor Road, and the memorial to Sir Robert Atkyns in Sapperton Church. Many students and others have also been supported in their historical research projects. Cirencester Archaeological and Historical Society shares many aims and concerns with Cirencester Civic Society, and both groups join annually for the Croome  Lecture each February.  We also hold an annual joint lecture with the Cirencester Science and Technology Society and include Cotswold Archaeology’s annual Mick Aston Lecture in our programme. If you would like to join us, see the membership page.